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The Student News Site of Lafayette High School

The Lafayette Times

The Student News Site of Lafayette High School

The Lafayette Times

Featuring English Electives

Lafayette High School Room 212, where the Journalism 1 elective takes place every A4 block. Taken on January 29th, 2024.

Here at Lafayette, you can take a wide variety of English courses. These courses are especially useful if you are interested in a career in reading or writing. All available English electives for Lafayette students are as follows: Advanced African American Literature, Advanced Speech, Advanced Writing 101, AP Art History, AP Research, Science Fiction Literature and World Mythology, Journalism, and Yearbook.

Some of these classes focus on reading specific pieces of literature to learn their effects on civilization. They help students’ critical thinking and reading skills, such as advanced African American literature. World Mythology and Science Fiction Literature (these classes are paired) are other examples of reading-focused classes. Other English electives are focused more on creative writing, like Advanced Writing 101. Suppose students wish to be involved in school life. In that case, they can take Journalism, in which they learn journalistic writing, photography, and interviewing skills to write articles for The Lafayette Times. On the other hand, students may workshop their public speaking skills, such as original oratory, interpretation, and storytelling through Advanced Speech.

We interviewed sophomore Evi Maxson, who is taking AP Research, to get more information on Lafayette’s English electives. In AP Research, students get to pick any topic that interests them to research throughout the year. “Students can do experiments or an analysis of existing research, or they can do surveys/interviews,” Maxson said. When asked if she would recommend other students to take AP Research, she responded, “Yes, students have [the ] freedom to choose whatever they want, and it can be really interesting and fun.” She also explained that it can be very rewarding for students to perfect their work and writing over the entire year so they feel very proud of their work by the time it’s over.

As we get closer to choosing our classes and submitting our schedule cards for the next school year, it’s essential to know which classes are right for each student and their interests. Whether they wish to be a news journalist or a science fiction author, choosing classes that interest them will be extremely beneficial for them and their career in the long run.

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About the Contributors
Anna Williams, Staff Writer
Anna Williams is a sophomore at Lafayette High School and a ballet major in the SCAPA program. She is also a part of the fundraising committee on student council. Outside of school, she dances at the Lexington Ballet Company and loves to read and go on walks. This is Anna’s first year with the Lafayette Times, and so far she’s been interested in writing about music, arts, news, and sports.
Mia Kai, Staff Writer
Mia Kai is a freshman at Lafayette High School. She loves writing and drawing, and is currently writing an adventure novel. She is excited to write and edit stories for the Lafayette Times. Outside of art and writing, she plays the violin and is a part of the Lafayette Concert Orchestra.